Pass the ball…to ALBRECHT

Pass the ball…to ALBRECHT

@1 year ago
#albrecht #michigan #wolverines #heyarnold 
iamjapanese:

TSUCHIYA Kōitsu(土屋 光逸 Japanese, 1870-1949)
Benkei Bridge (Benkei-bashi), from the series Views of Tokyo (Tôkyô fûkei)
弁慶橋 1933
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper

iamjapanese:

TSUCHIYA Kōitsu(土屋 光逸 Japanese, 1870-1949)

Benkei Bridge (Benkei-bashi), from the series Views of Tokyo (Tôkyô fûkei)

弁慶橋 1933

Woodblock print; ink and color on paper

(Source: flickr.com)

@1 year ago with 750 notes
exploratorium:

In this visualization seismic waves from small earthquakes are captured as they propagate across Long Beach CA by a 5300 pixel array of seismometers  spaced 100m apart.
 The array was built to look beneath the earth for oil bearing strata, but the company released this data to local geology professors who turned it into a movie to help us all understand how seismic waves propagate. The movie shows the waves moving in real time, and then slowed down by 1/2.
-Dr. Paul Dohery, Exploratorium Senior Scientist
(via Watch the ground ripple in Long Beach « The Trembling Earth)

exploratorium:

In this visualization seismic waves from small earthquakes are captured as they propagate across Long Beach CA by a 5300 pixel array of seismometers  spaced 100m apart.


The array was built to look beneath the earth for oil bearing strata, but the company released this data to local geology professors who turned it into a movie to help us all understand how seismic waves propagate. The movie shows the waves moving in real time, and then slowed down by 1/2.

-Dr. Paul Dohery, Exploratorium Senior Scientist

(via Watch the ground ripple in Long Beach « The Trembling Earth)

@1 year ago with 9 notes
@1 year ago
get weird

get weird

@1 year ago

if the Lehigh
River
could swallow us both one last time
i would alight on a branch
of a maple tree
and would stare as the brown
water of years passing
past compost

wastes

and urban decay 
and feel the same way
as when you left me
here 

as i do
today 

@1 year ago
#poetry 
@1 year ago with 1326 notes
rhamphotheca:

Male Narwhal or Unicorn (Monodon monoceros) and Greenland Shark (Somniosus microcephalus)
from An account of the Arctic regions with a history and description of the northern whale-fishery, by W. Scoresby. 1820. P. 588, Vol. II. Plate XV

rhamphotheca:

Male Narwhal or Unicorn (Monodon monoceros) and Greenland Shark (Somniosus microcephalus)

from An account of the Arctic regions with a history and description of the northern whale-fishery, by W. Scoresby. 1820. P. 588, Vol. II. Plate XV

(via biomedicalephemera)

@1 year ago with 268 notes
@1 year ago with 494 notes
biomedicalephemera:

Amputation of foot and leg with prostheses examples
Given that we largely only need our legs for balance and ambulation, and that we’re (usually) perfectly capable of balancing with one leg, making functional prostheses for the lower extremities was much simpler than making functional arms and hands. Heck, even a peg leg could work fine in most situations, at least if it was fitted well.
Most prostheses in the early-to-mid 19th century were focused more on aesthetics than on true usability. They looked like the real thing, and could easily be masked by pants and shoes, but they were often clunky, heavy, and ill-fitted (causing sores at the articulation point). Some doctors were trying to work on functional knees for prosthetic legs by that point, but those were even worse to use, as the “joint” was difficult to control.
Traité complet de l’anatomie de l’homme comprenant la medecine operatoire, par le docteur Marc Jean Bourgery. Nicolas Henri Jacob (artist), 1831.

biomedicalephemera:

Amputation of foot and leg with prostheses examples

Given that we largely only need our legs for balance and ambulation, and that we’re (usually) perfectly capable of balancing with one leg, making functional prostheses for the lower extremities was much simpler than making functional arms and hands. Heck, even a peg leg could work fine in most situations, at least if it was fitted well.

Most prostheses in the early-to-mid 19th century were focused more on aesthetics than on true usability. They looked like the real thing, and could easily be masked by pants and shoes, but they were often clunky, heavy, and ill-fitted (causing sores at the articulation point). Some doctors were trying to work on functional knees for prosthetic legs by that point, but those were even worse to use, as the “joint” was difficult to control.

Traité complet de l’anatomie de l’homme comprenant la medecine operatoire, par le docteur Marc Jean Bourgery. Nicolas Henri Jacob (artist), 1831.

(via biomedicalephemera)

@1 year ago with 761 notes